Restricted items policy guide published

Airport Parking and Hotels (APH) has created a guide comparing the airline policies for restricted items in cabin luggage, helping travellers to pack accordingly. The research compares 23 airlines including British Airways, Emirates and Qatar Airways, and looks at the various regulations for packing battery-powered hover boards, lithium batteries, electronic cigarettes, tweezers, umbrellas, matches and cigarette lighters in cabin luggage.

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Due to the potentially combustible lithium-ion battery, all 23 airlines researched ban the carriage of battery-powered hover boards in cabin luggage. However, all airlines researched do allow the carriage of lithium batteries of up to 160Wh, with American Airlines and WOW air extending this to allow lithium batteries with a power rating of up to 300Wh, with airline approval prior to departure. Likewise, 11 of the airlines, including Air Canada, Finnair and Monarch, state that batteries with a power rating of over 100Wh must be approved by the airline prior to travel. If travelling with spare lithium batteries, travellers should also ensure these are stored in the original packaging or are contained individually to prevent short-circuiting.

All of the airlines researched allow the carriage of e-cigarettes in cabin luggage, although the use of e-cigarettes on-board any flight is strictly prohibited. Passengers travelling with Aer Lingus should keep in mind that a maximum of 96ml of e-cigarette oil is permitted on-board and that passengers must store e-cigarettes in a designated carry case if travelling with Delta Air Lines. Equally, if travelling with Flybe, e-cigarette refills and bottles of nicotine are not permitted on-board the aircraft. Travellers should also keep in mind that certain countries may restrict or prohibit the import or use of e-cigarettes.

Five of the airlines researched, including Jet2, Norwegian Air Shuttle and Thomas Cook Airlines prohibit tweezers from being taken in cabin luggage due to their potentially sharp points and passengers should also keep in mind that an airline has the right to confiscate any other item that in their opinion could be used to endanger the aircraft or any of its passengers.

For those travelling to rainy climates, only one of the airlines researched, Emirates, bans the carriage of umbrellas in cabin luggage. Three airlines, including Aer Lingus, Virgin Atlantic and Icelandair, explicitly warn against pointed or sharp ends on umbrellas, which are not permitted in cabin luggage and large golfing-style umbrellas must be stored in the hold with six of the airlines researched.

The research can be found in the Know Before You Go section of the APH website: www.aph.com/restricted-items

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