Prestwick to hold consultation on airspace changes

Glasgow Prestwick Airport is starting an Airspace Change consultation, inviting members of the public to see its plans and contribute their views.

Navigation aids used for managing airspace are being replaced or removed as part of a national upgrade programme. As a result, airports across the UK are required to review their airspace management to develop procedures using the new state-of-the-art equipment.

Glasgow Prestwick Airport is seeking to replicate its existing flight paths as closely as possible, also using this opportunity to ensure routes are as efficient and environmentally friendly as possible while minimising noise impact on communities.

It is holding a 13-week consultation, starting on June 14 and ending on September 13, outlining potential departure and arrival routes.

This involves showing proposals to the general public alongside airport stakeholders, local authorities, MPs, MSPs and community councils.

The full consultation document is available to view online on Glasgow Prestwick Airport’s website and information will also be sent to libraries across the region.

Ron Smith, chief executive officer of Glasgow Prestwick Airport said: “This project is a significant investment for Glasgow Prestwick Airport. We are undertaking this as part of a national programme of air space change.

“Although we anticipate the change to be minimal, we are keen to ensure that we have consulted with the communities that host our operations.

“We are doing our utmost to make information on what we are proposing available – sharing the information in as many ways as possible. We look forward to receiving feedback and working through this along with the regulatory, technical and environmental considerations to finalise our proposals for the Civil Aviation Authority to approve.

Members of the public are encouraged to submit feedback online or by post on the suggested designs.

An Airspace Change Process is being undertaken by the majority of major airports across the UK, which have been using old-format equipment since the mid-1960s. There is now a need to modernise procedures to be compatible with new, state of the art satellite-based systems.  Once the consultation is closed, all feedback will be reviewed as part of the process to finalise technical designs. The findings will be published to show how they influenced the completed airspace map.

 

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